My day can start right. Kisses from Amarii.
#MiniSlinger

Nairobi sundown. Latergram from when we last saw the sun in Nairobi.
#igkenya
#igersnairobi
#cityofnairobi (at Kimathi Street)

Nothing much. Just chilling, bumping some @lecrae and looking cute.
A day in the life of #MiniSlinger

Wallpaper Monday [186] - Flow [Lake Naivasha]

Wallpaper Monday [186] – Flow [Lake Naivasha]

188_Flow_Mutua Matheka_blog

What a world cup season guys. I watched the final tonight on the edge the whole time. It’s been a fantastic month and now that it’s over, we have to find new obsessions guys, seriously. One of mine is obviously, travel. Especially road trips. I find that being on the road with no solid plan gives me a great thrill and the things you see make it worthwhile.

Last week a few friends & I went to…

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We also lifted our very own trophy today.
#MiniSlinger

🚍 (at kenyatta Avenue)

Some of y’all thought the boy in the previous photo was my boy on some GMO diet but alas, that was my godson. This here is #MiniSlinger and my stunner of a wife. My loves.

Hard at work. Helping his dad with some documentation on the tablet. 😃 #godson

@chibale_seven and the ghosts around him.
#igkenya
#igersnairobi
#cityofnairobi
#makeportraits (at kenyatta Avenue)

I shared some portraits I photographed some of the El Molo people of Turkana. I shared the images and the story on my blog. Please check it out. (mutuamatheka.co.ke/blog)
#igkenya
#onetouchlive
#shootingkenya (at mutuamatheka.co.ke/blog)

Father & son moments. My boy & my godson (his son). (at EkaHotel)

Headless portraits. Lovers & friends. (at Nairobi Animal Orphanage)

Wallpaper Monday [185] - Air Zanzibar [by Delaraystki]

Wallpaper Monday [185] – Air Zanzibar [by Delaraystki]

187_Air Zanzibar_by Dela_blog

Today, I have the great pleasure of introducing you to a friend from Tanzania called Salum Delaraystki. He lives in Zanzibar and I have been following his Instagramfor a while now. I love his perspective of Zanzibar and the fact that when I go there, I am sure I shall have a fantastic guide to show me all the cool places. Of particular interest to me was one of his aerial shots (he’s a pilot so…

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Dusk in the city. See all the city elements there.
#igkenya
#igersnairobi
#cityofnairobi (at Nairobi-Mombasa highway)

awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:


twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.

awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.

although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture.

despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.

these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.

(via nocturnalphantasmagoria)