5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here
5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo
*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…
previously posted here and here

5centsapound:

Denis Dailleux: Cairo

*truly one of the most gifted photographers currently working. His painterly use of colour is a rarity amongst so much of today’s sharp focal lengths and crisp digital frames. Of course the special ingredient is Dailleux’s obvious love for the city he is photographing…

previously posted here and here

(via iandafrica)

salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

(via moahandpainted)

dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup. 
dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.
A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.
Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far. 
As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla. 
During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup.

dynamicafrica:

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.

A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.

Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far.

As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla.

During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup.

(via ourafrica)

dynamicafrica:

Definitely one of the top ten moments at the World Cup so far! Thanks to Ghana’s Black Stars!

Miss those days when Nigerian football players used to celebrate goals by doing back flips and such. Then again, didn’t someone break their leg doing that?

(via soshespoke)

5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.
5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)
Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.
Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.
Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.

5centsapound:

Frederic de Woelmont: Yoff, Dakar (Senegal)

Yoff is a district of Dakar, Senegal. Originally a Lebou fishermen village, the place has since been urbanized but remains one of the most important traditional fishing ports of Senegal and the most traditional neighborhood of Dakar. Fishing and its related activities constitute the basis of the economy in Yoff.

Fishermen vary in number depending on the season. These fishermen are not only local, but also seasonal from Saint Louis, Kayar or the Petite Cote. The fish species include sardines, tuna, grouper, swordfish, monkfish, etc. Depending on the season, the fish caught can be pretty big (more than three meters for large swordfish). The technical means are fairly limited (motorized pirogues) and artisanal fishing is endangered by large trawlers practicing industrial fishing.

Yoff is a village that has retained much of its character. All the people know each other and most of the families have lived there for generations. Community spirit prevails. This makes it a place full of conviviality where it is pleasant to wander. A place of narrow, winding and silted up alleys where each bend allows for new discoveries, beautiful human encounters. A maze that resonates with the sound of children playing and the sound of the yards and backyards activities.

(via africaninsights)

wnderlst:

Landscapes of South Africa: Abel Erasmus Pass / Blyde River Canyon / Mariepskop | Mark Dumbleton
wnderlst:

Landscapes of South Africa: Abel Erasmus Pass / Blyde River Canyon / Mariepskop | Mark Dumbleton
wnderlst:

Landscapes of South Africa: Abel Erasmus Pass / Blyde River Canyon / Mariepskop | Mark Dumbleton

wnderlst:

Landscapes of South Africa: Abel Erasmus Pass / Blyde River Canyon / Mariepskop | Mark Dumbleton

(via royking)

dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers
dynamicafrica:

Some of the latest photos from Yaw Biney of Humans of Accra.
September: Highlighting African Photographers

dynamicafrica:

DYNAMIC AFRICA x VOODART INSTAGRAM TAKEOVER.

For our second instagram takeover, we’ve recruited the help of globetrotting Afropolitan Diane Audrey Ngako, otherwise known as ‘voodart’ on instagram and tumblr.

Born and raised in Cameroon, Diane now resides in France’s capital city and is a self-described ‘Parisian gyal’. Aside from travelling and taking beautiful pictures of her experiences, she’s the editor-in-chief of Roots Magazine - a French magazine dedicated to promoting  African and Caribbean culture France. Her love of travelling and passion for Africa and the Diaspora is exactly why we’re happy to let Diane take over and curate our instagram account for the next five days.

Starting on Monday (that’s tomorrow!), Diane will take us on a visual journey through various parts of Africa (and maybe more).

We’re keeping our lips sealed on where exactly you’ll be seeing pictures from. To find out, you’ll have to follow us on instagram!

africaninsights:

victoryclubhouse:

The Boateng brothers, together, apart.

Todays’ African.

Here hidden in a Ghanain and a German blood bond.

Streets of Nairobi. (at KENCOM Bus Stage, Nairobi)